Count the blossoms!

flower dandelion bouquet

That is a trick question. Each dandelion ‘flower’ head is actually composed of thousands of small ray flowers. So you might think of each dandelion as a very compact bouquet! Each ray flower makes an individual seed that will eventually fly away with a little help from you or a friendly breeze. The leaves, blossoms and roots of the dandelion are edible. You can pick the greens in your yard or buy larger dandelion greens at Whole Foods. The flowers are also collected to make wine. I had dandelion wine once at a farm in Ontario. It was over 40 years ago so I don’t remember it very well. I do recall that I thought it was very strong! But I was able to finish my glass. You can find dandelions all over the world. People used to plant them in their gardens. Maybe they still do… I have started planting them around my mailbox…

Published by

Carrie Staples

Author, illustrator of "The Yarn Animal Book", probably the only craft book with instructions for making such unique yarn animals as an orangutan, an ant eater, a llama and a star-nosed mole and "The Single Minded Prince, a fairy tale for all ages about a boy and a pirate captain who both misbehave. The books and a booklet series based on each different yarn craft topic covered in "The Yarn Animal Book" (pompoms and other really easy yarn crafts, knitting, crocheting, rya, needlepoint and embroidery), are available on Amazon and Kindle.

4 thoughts on “Count the blossoms!”

  1. My pet squirrel adored dandelions, too — both the leaves and the flowers. Our native “dandelion” outshines the European, in my estimation, although ours is a different genus, and a dandelion only in appearance. Right now it’s everywhere, and absolutely delightful: not least because it’s a native. No wine-making with that one! But, yes: dandelion and rhubarb wines were common when I was growing up. Good memories.

    Liked by 1 person

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